Breakout Sessions

March 26, 2018

Creating a Buzz With Insects

Cheryl Preyer, Policy Administrator - Feed, North American Coalition for Insect Agriculture (NACIA); Aly Moore, Entomophagmist and Media Expert, Bugible; Julie Lesnick, Wayne State University; Wendy Lu McGill, Rocky Mountain Micro Ranch; Daniel Asher, Chef/Partner River and Woods, Chef/Founder EcoChef Culinary, River and Woods

Monday, March 26, 2018

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Panel on insects in food and feed (emphasis on food).  Insects are a sustainable food source for people and livestock already eaten by around 2 billion people globally. Learn more about how insects are being grown and used in ways to overcome the "ick" factor.

Learn more about Cheryl

Learn more about Aly

Learn more about Julie

Learn more about Wendy Lu

Learn more about Daniel




Innovating "Around" the Fountain

Andy Dratt, Chief Commercial Officer, Imbibe

Monday, March 26, 2018

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Beverage innovation in foodservice, especially for QSR and fast-casual chains, is often challenging because many companies are tied to contracts with the beverage behemoths. This presentation will provide market trends, product insights and practical solutions to help the audience understand how to use alternative ingredients to enhance their beverage offerings.

Whether your goal is to make your establishment a beverage destination, drive traffic into your store across dayparts or simply offer variety to the appeal to the ever-changing tastes of consumers, you will come away with some concrete examples of how to optimize their beverage menu for today’s (and tomorrow’s) consumer.

Learn more about Andy




The Current Food Labeling Landscape

Lauren Swan, Nutritionist, Concept Nutrition, Inc.

Monday, March 26, 2018

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

The food labeling landscape presentation will discuss relevant trends, issues, challenges and news updates about food labeling regulations as related to product development, menus and marketing communications.

Learn more about Lauren




Sous Vide from its French Origins to US Restaurant Adoption and into Commercial Uses and Applications 

Benjamin Pasternak, President, Olek Group, Inc.; Bernard Leveau, CEO, SYMBACONSULTANT; Jean Marc Tachet, Chef, Academie Culinaire; Bryan Voltaggio, Executive Chef and Owner

Monday, March 26, 2018

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

We will cover the origins of sous vide cooking from its purest form in fine French dining to its explosive adoption in the US restaurant industry and rapid growth as an industrial tool for US food processing.

Course will address:

  • Basics of sous vide , from packaging, vacuum pressures, techniques and cooking times/temps
  • Adoption, application, and next direction by US restaurants
  • Tour the largest Sous vide plant in North America, see the products and applications that are being produced

Designed for the novice and the advanced sous vide devotee ….catch up and learn more about this vital tool that is RE- SHAPING American cuisine.

Learn more about Benjamin

Learn more about Bernard

Learn more about Jean Marc

Learn more about Brian




Squeezing Out a Living in South Georgia and Prospecting for Liquid Gold in the Southeast

Clay Oliver, Founder, Oliver Farms; Vicki Shaw Hughes, Georgia Olive Farms

Monday, March 26, 2018

2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

Learn how hardships and challenges brought forth new opportunities for a century old family farm. Clay Oliver tells how an interest in on farm biofuel production led to a value added business producing gourmet oils and gluten free flours. The second part of this session will address the process of developing the Olive Oil Industry in the Southeastern United States.

Learn more about Clay

Learn more about Vicki




Tour of Chocolate: A Guided Tasting

Gabrielle Draper, R&D Technical Culinary Application Chef, Barry Callebaut

Monday, March 26, 2018

2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

The guided tasting will be an inclusive chocolate experience provided by Barry Callebaut R&D Technical Culinary Application Chef Gabrielle Draper.

In this session, Chef Gabrielle will use her experience and wealth of knowledge to pull back the curtain and give you an insider’s view on application ideas and critical chocolate topics, including:

  • Percentage of cocoa mass and how it can affect flavor/functionality.
  • Origin chocolates vs. blended chocolates.
  • Flavor and functionality differences of chocolate ingredients such as milk powders, vanilla/vanillin.
  • Influence of dextrose on chocolate.
  • Selection: choosing chocolate versus a compound product.
  • And, of course, free chocolate!

Learn more about Gabrielle




White Paper Session

Robert Danhi, Research Chef, Chef Danhi & Co.; Jonathan Deutsch, Ph.D., Professor of Culinary Arts and Food Science, Drexel University; Robert D., Johnson, Foodservice New Business Development Director, Red Arrow Products- A Division of Kerry

Monday, March 26, 2018

2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

This session will include three short talk presentations.

Enhancing Flavor Satisfaction and Stability of Bacon via Incorporation of Naturally Smoked Sugar

Robert D., Johnson, Foodservice New Business Development Director, Red Arrow Products- A Division of Kerry

Bacon is an iconic product with over $4.4 billion in U.S. refrigerated sales. It is a versatile item used across all day parts and consumed as a stand-alone item or as an ingredient. Oxidative rancidity challenges lead to decreased sensory satisfaction (off-flavor) and limit acceptability. Bacon, especially intended for food service use, is prone to undesirable flavor changes during distribution and storage as evidenced in frozen, layout style packaging configurations which is very common. In part, this stems from swine consuming by-product feed ingredients originating from the ethanol industry. Dried distilled grains fed are higher in unsaturated fatty acids compared with traditional feedstuffs. This results in the fat portion being more unsaturated than historical norms and is more susceptible to undergoing molecular changes leading to rancidity and off flavor.

Scientific and culinary studies were undertaken to determine sensory and shelf-life (flavor stability) benefits of including naturally smoked sugar as an ingredient in the curing solution solutions. In order to negate any influence due to biological variation, treatments consisted of pork bellies bisected in the center so that each set of paired samples had its own “control”. The study was replicated three times under closely controlled conditions as Kansas State University’s Meat Science Center.

Bacon that had naturally smoked sugar in the cure, was found to possess a more desirable flavor scores using trained descriptive sensory panelists (no rancidity) (P<0.05) for a longer storage period (p<0.05) compared with control counter parts. In addition, TBA tests were performed on all samples to identify if rancidity was evident and the rate of its progression. The objective TBA data corroborated favorably with subjective sensory panel results. TBA data confirmed in that samples containing naturally smoked sugar had lower (less rancid, off-flavor) (P<0.05) values than untreated counterparts.

Implications of these findings strongly suggest that smoke enhances flavor desirability and functions as a natural preservative by inhibiting and minimizing deleterious changes to flavor as result of oxidative rancidity progression during storage and distribution. Because of its versatility and that smoke/savory are trending quite high, bacon is often times used as a vehicle to deliver the smoky, savory flavor to the food or beverage. Adaptation of these learnings enable a natural, clean-labeled, cost effective and consistent approach to delivering a smoky, savory sense of deliciousness to formulated foods and beverages as well enjoyed as a traditional side of the plate slice.

Cultivating Subjectivity in Product Tastings

Robert Danhi, Research Chef, Chef Danhi & Co.

Every organization struggles during daily and weekly internal cuttings and tastings especially when most companies throw out the knowledge, expertise and rigor applied to “Sensory Evaluation” and over simplify by an informal tasting, discussion and a few notes. Too often it becomes the loudest voice guides the next steps of formulation. Blending qualitative and quantitative evaluation techniques R&D teams can leverage subjectivity and capture a objective summary of what the team feels the customer wants. It is important to learn more about ways to not only provide a better structure during the tasting, but also utilize the tools and technology you already have invested in your innovation process. Study will include interviews with industry leaders, document current best practices and propose new ways in conceptualizing, implementing a systematic process that takes scientific process of sensory evaluation out of the lab and into the kitchens of R&D Chefs.

Cook from Frozen Seafood: Driving Consumers to Sustainability, Convenience, Safety, and Margin

Jonathan Deutsch, Ph.D., Professor of Culinary Arts and Food Science, Drexel University

There seems to be a widespread perception—confirmed by our collaborators in industry and consumer insights—that an abundant seafood counter full of “fresh” fish on ice is more desirable than frozen seafood selections. Ironically, the fish at that counter is typically much less fresh than its frozen counterpart and, even in coastal stores, is typically defrosted, labeled “fresh from frozen.” Once defrosted, the fish cannot be safely refrozen and typically goes to waste if not purchased. After display, it is not a good candidate for conversion to prepared foods at the retail level. Defrosted fish allows for additional waste at the household level. Purchased fish sits in a refrigerator as plans change and may be discarded without being cooked or refrozen by the consumer after the growth of microbes from the defrosted stage. Further, “fresh” fish counters need to be staffed by knowledgeable personnel and margins on frozen seafood are typically higher than those of the seafood counter.

Inspired by this sad situation, where hundreds of thousands of fish are defrosted, displayed and discarded at seafood counters daily, Pete Pearson of WWF asked if it would be possible to cook fish directly from its frozen state, the way one cooks a hamburger patty. The Drexel Food Lab investigated many varieties in many formats and found that, with some caveats, the answer is a resounding “yes,” both for fish and other forms of seafood, despite the prevailing package directions that call for defrosting in the refrigerator or under running water (further wasteful).

In partnership with Wakefern, the Drexel Food Lab of the Center for Food and Hospitality Management at Drexel University, Brown’s Super Stores, Kroger, and the World Wildlife Fund, consumers are receiving educational materials and in-store demonstrations on cook-from-frozen recipes. Learn the opportunities and challenges in this area, overview of consumer feedback, and preliminary sales data showing how a more sustainable option can also be a more profitable one for retailers.




Women Leaders: Taking Charge of Your Career 

Maria Brock, Director, Business Development, Women’s Foodservice Forum; Dianna Fricke, CRC, CWPC, Director of Culinary National Accounts, J.R. Simplot Company; Allison Oesterle, Director of Research & Development, Shake Shack Enterprises; Rosemary Trout, Department Head, Culinary Arts & Food Science, Drexel University

Monday, March 26, 2018

2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

Sponsored by Griffith Foods

Maria Brock will lead a panel discussion with leaders in the research chef segment of the food industry who are (and have taken) charge of their careers.  They’ll describe best practices, habits and other steps/tactics/tools that have helped shape their career success and future potential.  

Learn more about Maria

Learn more about Dianna

Learn more about Allison

Learn more about Rosemary




MARCH 27, 2018

Design Thinking Contemporary Pork Loin and Rib Fabrication

Kang Kuan, Chef, Tyson Foods Innovation Lab; David Newman, Associate Professor of Animal Science, A State

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

In conjunction with AMSA

The Contemporary Pork Fabrication method is a deliberate and focused approach to disrupt the Tyson Fresh Meat Commodity model as well as the continuous decreasing pork value utilizing Design Thinking methodology. This best in class collaboration across two diametrically different businesses between Tyson Fresh Meats and Prepared Foods creates unique opportunities and new business model never existed before. This innovative and contemporary fabrication techniques address the constraints of larger hog carcass weight, limitation of commodity processor line speed, shrinking margins, as well as consumer white space and pain points. The new cuts were created with minimal drop credit, white table cloth presentation, and were filed for patent protection. These new pork cuts were launched with consumers in mind, and generated chef operator interest through experiential food celebration event, rather than the distributor visit with boxes of raw meats.

Learn more about Kang

Learn more about David




WIN-WIN! Culinary Innovation + Regulatory Compliance

Steve B. Steinborn, Partner, Hogan Lovells

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Corporate chefs know how to interpret ingredient, menu and consumer trends—and transform those insights into new product innovation. But what if you could increase your odds of new products success with just one more bit of trend monitoring?

Steven Steinborn is a partner with the Washington, DC, office of Hogan Lovells and he literally wrote the book on food labeling as a principal author of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) labeling guide. Representing food processors, restaurant chains, foodservice operators, ingredient suppliers, and trade associations, Steven has 28 years of experience in food and beverage industry issues of advertising, labeling, and food safety. He routinely evaluates new product concepts and devises regulatory strategies to ensure a clear path to product launch and success.

Come hear Steinborn outline current regulatory challenges and provide a peek at what’s coming next. He will share regulatory strategies that have proven effective and beneficial to new product development—as well as examples of strategies that have failed. Steinborn also will share practical insights and “tips” to effectively manage legal compliance and leverage legal and regulatory resources in a way that supports innovation!

Learn more about Steve




PeasOnMoss Podcast Live

Kimberly Schaub, Senior Product Development Scientist, Podcast Host, Certified Culinary Scientist, Peas On Moss

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Join Kimberly and a few previous guests of the Peas On Moss podcast as they record a special episode from the RCA Conference. See how we record and get an update on a few of the most popular guests we have had on the show so far. Panelists Kami R Smith, Darryl Holliday, Barbara Zatto, Emily Munday will lead a discussion around topics like a Chef’s identity away from the restaurant, mis en place on the bench - how culinary techniques translate into product development, leadership and mentorship, why attending events is a priority and the best thing you've eaten/drunk/seen in Savannah. 

Learn more about Kimberly




The Seafood Terroir of the Low Country - Shrimp and Oysters

Thomas Bliss, Director: Shellfish Research Laboratory, The University of Georgia; Bryan Fluech, Associate Marine Extension Director, University of Georgia

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Familiar ingredients taste different in the low country. For this session, we are focusing on life-cycle of Local Shrimp and Oysters, native to the area...and then taste — comparing the same genus and species grown in different locations

Learn more about Thomas

Learn more about Bryan




Plant-Based Protein Growing in Consumer Demand

Cian Leahy, Culinary Chef, Kerry Foodservice

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Kerry will present insights on how consumers are adjusting their eating habits to include more plant-based protein options, and how restaurant menus have added items to deliver. We will demonstrate a new plant-based protein product, that's versatile with different cooking techniques, builds and flavor profiles. You'll also get the opportunity to taste this meat alternative option, and think of new ways to utilize it on your menus!


It’s Not Me, It's You, And By the Way... What Is So Great About Natural?

Roger Maehler, PhD, Sr. Director of Research, Newly Weds Foods

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

When it comes to food safety, consumers blame the industry for leaving unavoidable pathogens in raw products. Industry blames un-trainable consumers for mishandling those raw products.  Both are right; but this seemingly intractable problem is actually easily solved … outbreaks will stop when inept consumers can safely handle products with unavoidable contamination. But, can that be accomplished with great taste and all-natural ingredients?  Whether it’s for comfort or avoidance of processed ingredients, consumers are demanding food like grandma used to make.  Well, I can tell you what was in grandma’s cupboard …. DDT.  So what really does make food healthy and wholesome?  You may think you know the answer, but ….?


Plant Based. Protein Packed. And Delicious.

William Cawley, Culinary Director, ADM; Shelley Rudisill, Senior Culinary Scientist, ADM

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

In this presentation, William Cawley and Shelley Rudisill will highlight ADM’s unparalleled portfolio of plant-based protein and taste solutions. ADM’s plant-based proteins, flavors and other complementary ingredient work synergistically to deliver consumer-preferred eating and drinking experiences — while meeting your cost and quality needs — all from a single trusted supplier.


Umami - a key trend in food service

Heidi Geisenhoff, Applications Manager, Biospringer

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Have you ever heard about umami? Identified several decades ago, this taste has now been added to the four basic tastes of: saltiness, sweetness, bitterness and sourness. We will take a look at this fifth taste, which is still largely unknown but becoming one of the hottest trends in food service. The word “umami” comes from a Japanese word which means “savoury taste.” Umami describes a pleasant, mouth-filling, lingering taste. This taste stimulates salivation and activates the brain’s pleasure zones. And although it is often associated with Japanese cuisine, this taste is found in the cooking of all cultures worldwide. The umami taste is also evident in the food service sector where culinary chef’s are experimenting with ways to add umami to create unique and robust flavor profiles.


Is Eating Wild the Next "Real Foods" Trend?

Michael Collins, Brand Strategist, Ethos Marketing; Laura Guthrie, Sr. Marketing & Business Development, JMH Premium; Nicole DeBloois, Sr. R&D Manager, JMH Premium 

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

3:00 p.m. - 3:30 a.m.

Wild Food tells a timeless story of the undiminished power of nature. It connects us to our ancestors and to the flavors and powerful health benefits that have nourished humans and animals for thousands of years. It also has the potential to differentiate and elevate your brand and your menu. Join the Wild Blueberry Association and JMH Premium to explore the “wild side” of today’s Real Foods marketplace. See what food industry thought leaders have to say about the Power of Wild. Get a glimpse into new research that demonstrates the positive impact Wild can have on consumer demand and brand perception.  Taste Wild Blueberry product innovation in action with delicious bites from JMH Premium and imagine how you might incorporate the Power of Wild into your operation.


MARCH 28, 2018

Beef’s Sustaining Role on the Menu

Sara Place, Senior Director of Sustainable Beef Production Research, National Cattlemen's Beef Association; Tracey Erickson, Vice President of Marketing, Certified Angus Beef, LLC

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

What is it about beef that consumers crave? Is beef a sustainable protein choice? Join this session to hear food science, marketing and sustainability experts about how beef can play a role in today's marketplace striking a balance of taste, nutrition and sustainability. Brought to you by beef farmers and ranchers.

Learn more about Sara

Learn more about Tracey




How to Become a Better Trend Spotter

Mike Kostyo, Senior Publications Manager, Datassential

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Sponsored by Paradise 

As the trend cycle moves faster and faster, staying on top of the latest food and menu trends can feel like an impossible task. As soon as you put a cauliflower steak on the menu, consumers want mermaid lattes.

In this session we'll not only cover a wide-range of real-world trends, but we'll uncover eight core concepts behind these trends that will make you a better trend spotter in the future. Learn how to think more creatively, critically, and strategically, all with an eye towards developing new menu ideas, products, and concepts, whether you are reading food media from the comfort of your desk or visiting concepts in-person. Plus, we'll combine it all with consumer and operator data to back up our findings.

Learn more about Mike




The Playbook for Creating Delicious, Plant-Based Foods That Consumers Love

John Stephanian, Director, Culinary Development, ADM

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Sponsored by CSSI Marketing and Culinary

Demand for delicious, plant-based, nutritious and clean-label foods and drinks continues, and in parallel, people are turning to products that carry a story, are perceived to be of higher quality and align with their values.

In this presentation, ADM Chef John Stephanian will explore what's driving our evolving food culture, review how this evolution is impacting buyer behavior and share the playbook for creating products that meet the ever-evolving and multi-layered needs of today’s consumers.

Learn more about John




Culinology Degree Programs: Today and Beyond

Michael Cheng, Interim Dean, Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, Florida International University

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

2:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

Culinology degree program and learn about best practices in recruitment, retention, networking and placement.

Learn more about Michael




Trash Is Cash – Food Waste Solutions

Erin Bannan, Culinary Liaison R&D Chef, Coffee Flour; Phil Saneski, VP of Product, ReGrained, Inc.; Samuel Burges, Co-Founder, OURgrain Inc.

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

2:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

This innovative session will talk about turning "trash" into cash, the inherently abundant supply chain models that make business "cents" for companies of any size, and how Culinology principles can troubleshoot food waste into delicious products--and thus solutions--at scale. Whether a company that closes nutrient loops internally by upcyclying what would be waste into profit or a company cultivated from ingredients historically considered byproducts, food waste means business this will be a valuable session.

Learn more about Erin

Learn more about Phil

Learn more about Samuel




White Paper Session

Veronica Borne, Technical Services Manager, CPKELCO; William R. Dixon, PhD Student, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Amadeus Driando Ahnan, PhD Student, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

2:15 P.M. - 3:15 P.M.

This session will include three short talk presentations.

Effect of Tempeh Fermentation on the Extractability, Phenolic Content, and Oxidative

Amadeus Driando Ahnan, PhD Student, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Objective Statement. Vitamin content and degradation are major concerns regarding space food. Throughout their production, vitamins are lost due to unavoidable environmental conditions meant to extend the food shelf life and maximize food safety. However, monitoring vitamin C loss periodically during routine thermal processing of solid foods is technically unfeasible. To understand the relationship between vitamin degradation, time, temperature, and to predict vitamin loss during thermoprocessing, a model was developed that can derive the kinetic parameters, which describe the degradation behavior of a given compound in a given food matrix, from merely the vitamin concentration endpoints and time-temperature records of two thermoprocesses. 

Material and Methods. In this study, two NASA-utilized space foods: rhubarb applesauce and sugar snap peas, were heat stabilized using three thermal processes. Time-temperature records were given throughout each process, and vitamin C content was determined before and after each process. Rhubarb applesauce represented a low pH (pH < 4.6) food matrix and sugar snap peas represented a high pH (pH > 4.6) product. All foods were prepared per NASA instruction and packaged with nearly identical packaging material as used by NASA products.

Results. After analyzing vitamin C concentration before and after thermoprocessesing and thereby determining the kinetic degradation parameters in each food, our model demonstrated less than 6% average difference between experimental and predicted concentration values for both foods (2.7% difference for Rhubarb Applesauce and 5.9% difference for Sugar Snap Peas) showing promising applications for our model being used in predicting vitamin C loss in foods exposed to heat processing. All vitamin C concentrations were expressed as mean + standard deviation (SD) across the six replicates for each food and thermal process. The coefficient of variation and a 0.95% confidence interval was used to compute sample size and minimize relative error.

Conclusion. The method used to predict vitamin C concentration post-processing provided a reliable platform to help predict vitamin loss during retort processing. The model provided here is a great tool to reduce experimental calculations needed to reveal degradation behavior and provide highly reliable estimations of vitamin C concentration at different temperature profiles during retort processing and potentially any other form of heat processing where temperature can be tracked and is non-negative.

Impact of Stabilizers and Processing Conditions on Pea Protein, Low pH Beverages

Maricarmen Estrada, Research Scientist, CPKELCO

Introduction. As pea protein increases market shares in the beverage world, it is essential to gain a more complete understanding of the optimum selection of hydrocolloids to enhance the long-term stability of acidified protein drinks (APDs) containing pea protein. In general, the stabilization of APDs requires the proper selection of hydrocolloids with critical parameters in batching (i.e., hydration of hydrocolloids and proteins, order of addition of ingredients) and processing conditions.

Objective statement. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a selection of hydrocolloids on a 1% acidified pea protein drink (pH 4.0). In addition, the effect of homogenization of the pea protein before mixing with the rest of the system was also assessed.

Materials and Methods. To achieve this objective, pectin, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), a blend of pectin/gellan, and a blend of CMC/gellan gums were evaluated between 0.4% and 0.6% use levels. Additionally, an unstabilized APD containing 0.5% pea protein was prepared. The hydrocolloids and the pea protein were hydrated properly following the internal and protein supplier recommendations. The overall stability and quality of the beverages were graded based on visual stability (e.g., sediment), particle size, viscosity flow curves, and mouthfeel.

Results. As expected, the use of protective hydrocolloids (i.e., pectin, CMC) was required to prevent the proteins from aggregating and sedimenting at an acidic pH, especially after heat treatment. All samples containing either CMC or pectin showed a smaller average particle size and a smoother mouthfeel compared to the unstabilized sample. However, the addition of protective hydrocolloids, even at the higher use level, was not enough to provide long-term suspension of pea protein, and these APDs showed sediment within minutes to hours after processing. The homogenization of the pea protein solution before incorporation into the system reduced the particle size and slightly delayed the settling of the proteins but still was not enough to achieve long-term stability. Gellan gum addition was essential to provide long-term suspension of pea protein in these APDs. All beverages containing blends of CMC/gellan and pectin/gellan showed small particle size, higher pseudoplasticity, no sediment, and overall good stability at ambient and refrigerated temperatures throughout the 4 weeks of evaluation. Additionally, the homogenization of the pea protein solution before incorporation into the system improved the mouthfeel and gave the APDs a creamier appearance.

Conclusion. Based on these learnings, the most stable pea protein APD will result from the combination of a pea protein solution homogenized before mixing into the system, as well as the addition of a blend of pectin/gellan or CMC/gellan, providing the beverage with protein protection and suspension.

Prediction of Vitamin C Loss during Thermal Preservation of Two Spacefoods

William R. Dixon, PhD Student, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Objective Statement.  Vitamin content and degradation are major concerns regarding space food. Throughout their production, vitamins are lost due to unavoidable environmental conditions meant to extend the food shelf life and maximize food safety. However, monitoring vitamin C loss periodically during routine thermal processing of solid foods is technically unfeasible. To understand the relationship between vitamin degradation, time, temperature, and to predict vitamin loss during thermoprocessing, a model was developed that can derive the kinetic parameters, which describe the degradation behavior of a given compound in a given food matrix, from merely the vitamin concentration endpoints and time-temperature records of two thermoprocesses.

Material and Methods. In this study, two NASA-utilized space foods: rhubarb applesauce and sugar snap peas, were heat stabilized using three thermal processes. Time-temperature records were given throughout each process, and vitamin C content was determined before and after each process. Rhubarb applesauce represented a low pH (pH < 4.6) food matrix and sugar snap peas represented a high pH (pH > 4.6) product. All foods were prepared per NASA instruction and packaged with nearly identical packaging material as used by NASA products.

Results. After analyzing vitamin C concentration before and after thermoprocessesing and thereby determining the kinetic degradation parameters in each food, our model demonstrated less than 6% average difference between experimental and predicted concentration values for both foods (2.7% difference for Rhubarb Applesauce and 5.9% difference for Sugar Snap Peas) showing promising applications for our model being used in predicting vitamin C loss in foods exposed to heat processing. All vitamin C concentrations were expressed as mean + standard deviation (SD) across the six replicates for each food and thermal process. The coefficient of variation and a 0.95% confidence interval was used to compute sample size and minimize relative error.

Conclusion. The method used to predict vitamin C concentration post-processing provided a reliable platform to help predict vitamin loss during retort processing. The model provided here is a great tool to reduce experimental calculations needed to reveal degradation behavior and provide highly reliable estimations of vitamin C concentration at different temperature profiles during retort processing and potentially any other form of heat processing where temperature can be tracked and is non-negative.